Saturday, May 28, 2011

Book Review: Bossypants

I admit, I do not religiously watch 30 Rock. In fact, I’ve only seen two episodes in my entire life. And while Iwatch SNL on occasion, it’s a very rare occasion. I can, however, quote Mean Girls with the best of them (“You go, Glen Coco! Four for you, Glen Coco!”) and really respect Tina Fey. I think she’s incredibly smart, hilarious, gorgeous, and totally in charge of her life. When Bossypants came out, I was hesitant to pick up a copy because I don’t really follow 30 Rock, and thought a lot of the humor would go straight over my head.

Boy, was I wrong. In fact, if anything, I think I took away some very important lessons after reading this book.

Some things I’ve taken away with me:
- Make sure I know where the lifeboats are when/if I ever go on a cruise.
- My Sarah Palin impersonation could use some work.
- If you even remotely look like someone famous, use it to your advantage.
- I should’ve spent more time with theater kids after high school.
- Never hike up a mountain at night to impress a boy.
- Don’t provide my children with informational packets meant for adults.
- It will be a huge hassle to get Oprah to appear on my future Emmy-nominated reality show.
- I need to be in more professional photo shoots.

Bossypants is essentially a memoir detailing the (not-so) finer points of Tina Fey’s existence. It covers her awkward childhood, reminding me of some of my own mishaps. Of course she talks about her time with SNL and her current place at 30 Rock. But above that, it’s incredibly empowering. The feminist in me fist-pumped at many points throughout the book. Tina Fey sets a great example, not just for women, but for anyone (especially the awkward and average) trying to do something with their life. After I finished, I felt like I could go out there and do anything. Except maybe fly.

Tina Fey tells it like it is. She encourages people to be who they are and nothing less. If there’s one thing I took away from her book, it’s that.

Also, to have a box of Kleenex nearby. To wipe away the constant flow of tears caused by endless laughter.